Tsunami Help Home   Enquiry   Missing Persons   News Updates   Help Needed   Help Offered  

Saturday, January 01, 2005

Finding Missing Persons In Myanmar

The Center for Diplomatic Missions has staff on the ground in Myanmar (Burma) and is willing to relay missing persons inquiries for local effort to locate by phone or address visit.

Send the best available data regarding the person sought, include all hotel names, cities and any other data you may have or suspicion -- the more information you provide the better our staff can assist you.

Communications in and out are difficult-to-impossible, but we have Satphone contact with email relay and will be happy to assist as many as possible.

James A. Howell, Director
The Center for Diplomatic Missions
Washington, DC (202) 331-6640
New York, NY (212) 714-8360
Ft. Lauderdale, FL (954) 588-0264

3 Comments Post a Comment
Blogger Bala said :

Test Comment to test the blogids integrity

4:44 AM  
Blogger shawn alladio said :

The link for the Drowning Support Network is:
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/DrowningSupportNetwork

All are welcome to join and participate in this peer support group for those who have lost loved ones in incidents involving drowning, especially when the recovery of remains has been prolonged, complicated, or not achieved...

Thank you,

Nancy
Moderator



______________________________

Complete vs. Incomplete Rescue (excerpt)

It is our supposition that too often rescues are not "complete," but remain "incomplete" both for the primary and secondary victim(s) as well as the rescuers.1 We understand that the main focus of a rescue must be on the physical, life-preserving aspects of medical trauma intervention. However, the rescuer is often so focused on the physical issues that psychologically traumatic issues, issues that may result in life-long negative health consequences, are not attended to, recorded or intervened upon, and result in an incomplete rescue.

Contrary to "popular" opinion, posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) may occur at a shockingly high prevalence (Mitchell and Everly 1993). Norman and Getek (1988) have estimated that nearly one-half of all patients admitted to urban trauma centers are likely to suffer from PTSD in addition to their physical trauma, while another third may suffer from a milder variant of posttraumatic stress.

Contrary to "popular" opinion, posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) may occur at a shockingly high prevalence (Mitchell and Everly 1993). Norman and Getek (1988) have estimated that nearly one-half of all patients admitted to urban trauma centers are likely to suffer from PTSD in addition to their physical trauma, while another third may suffer from a milder variant of posttraumatic stress.

It has been argued by Brett and Ostroff (1985) that PTSD is generally underreported and underdiagnosed. One reason may be that patients are sometimes hesitant to report on or unable to recognize psychological issues surrounding traumatic events. In addition, PTSD may be masked by, overlap or mimic other disorders such as drug abuse. Healthcare workers may also lack the training necessary to properly diagnose and treat PTSD.

Even the term "disorder" can be confusing and stigmatizing, causing victims to avoid or deny their reactions. As Lifton (1973) and Lifton and Olson (1976) remind us: PTSD is a normal adaptive process to an abnormal situation . . . If the threat or trauma is sufficiently great, it can produce a traumatic syndrome in everyone.

One thing is certain, PTSD and related posttraumatic stress syndromes have the potential of causing life-long, chronic health problems. They can end a career and/or literally consume an individual's life.

4:46 AM  
Blogger shawn alladio said :

The link for the Drowning Support Network is:
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/DrowningSupportNetwork

All are welcome to join and participate in this peer support group for those who have lost loved ones in incidents involving drowning, especially when the recovery of remains has been prolonged, complicated, or not achieved...

Thank you,

Nancy Rigg
Moderator



______________________________

Complete vs. Incomplete Rescue (excerpt)

It is our supposition that too often rescues are not "complete," but remain "incomplete" both for the primary and secondary victim(s) as well as the rescuers.1 We understand that the main focus of a rescue must be on the physical, life-preserving aspects of medical trauma intervention. However, the rescuer is often so focused on the physical issues that psychologically traumatic issues, issues that may result in life-long negative health consequences, are not attended to, recorded or intervened upon, and result in an incomplete rescue.

Contrary to "popular" opinion, posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) may occur at a shockingly high prevalence (Mitchell and Everly 1993). Norman and Getek (1988) have estimated that nearly one-half of all patients admitted to urban trauma centers are likely to suffer from PTSD in addition to their physical trauma, while another third may suffer from a milder variant of posttraumatic stress.

Contrary to "popular" opinion, posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) may occur at a shockingly high prevalence (Mitchell and Everly 1993). Norman and Getek (1988) have estimated that nearly one-half of all patients admitted to urban trauma centers are likely to suffer from PTSD in addition to their physical trauma, while another third may suffer from a milder variant of posttraumatic stress.

It has been argued by Brett and Ostroff (1985) that PTSD is generally underreported and underdiagnosed. One reason may be that patients are sometimes hesitant to report on or unable to recognize psychological issues surrounding traumatic events. In addition, PTSD may be masked by, overlap or mimic other disorders such as drug abuse. Healthcare workers may also lack the training necessary to properly diagnose and treat PTSD.

Even the term "disorder" can be confusing and stigmatizing, causing victims to avoid or deny their reactions. As Lifton (1973) and Lifton and Olson (1976) remind us: PTSD is a normal adaptive process to an abnormal situation . . . If the threat or trauma is sufficiently great, it can produce a traumatic syndrome in everyone.

One thing is certain, PTSD and related posttraumatic stress syndromes have the potential of causing life-long, chronic health problems. They can end a career and/or literally consume an individual's life.

4:51 AM